Enjoying the Journey: My first writer’s conference.

Well lovely writers, I did it, I confronted my fear of the professional literary world this weekend.

Just to clarify, I don’t exactly fear the lit world; it’s more so I find it a bit intimidating. I love following industry professionals and other authors on Twitter, but being connected via web versus talking to actual people in person are two different things.

So on Saturday, I attended the Chesapeake Writers Workshop in DC. The majority of the day was spent absorbing a TON of information about the industry from Chuck Sambuchino of Writer’s Digest. From self-publishing versus traditional publishing to building your own platform, Chuck covered a LOT of topics and provided an incredible amount of insight. If you have an opportunity to attend one of his many speaking events, do so. It’s more than worth it.

He’s posted a list of his upcoming events on his website, here. Also, if you haven’t checked out his blog, Guide to Literary Agents, on Writer’s Digest, do so here.

Along with the fantastic lectures, I had the opportunity to formally pitch two agents. Both Ella Kennen of Corvisiero and Jamie Bodnar Drowley of Inklings were so sweet and knowledgeable and really made my first pitching experience so enjoyable [though I’m pretty sure I was a rambling mess!]. Leon Husock of L. Perkins was also kind enough to hear my bumbling pitch after the workshop ended, which I am EXTREMELY grateful for, especially because I’m pretty sure he was done for the day and just wanted information on getting a cab. Sigh.

Attendees of the workshop also had the opportunity to have their WIP’s first page read by the agents in a panel setting. The agents, including Mr. Husock, gave their feedback on what would cause them to stop reading the sample. Though my own first page was not read (there was a limited amount of time for the panel and there were a LOT of writers in attendance), the agents’ input was incredibly helpful. Many first pages had similar issues, so I will be sure to try and avoid those pitfalls in the future.

In conclusion, my recommendation is to do your best to attend these conferences and workshops. Even if you bomb your pitches, discussing your project with an industry professional is an invaluable opportunity. It can let you know if you’re heading in the right direction or if you need to re-evaluate and adjust.

As I said in a previous post, be gracious and kind. Sometimes the truth is hard to hear, but you and your WIP will be better for it. So even if you hear something you don’t want to hear [like the importance of building your platform], don’t argue, just accept the advice and make a decision later.

And most importantly, just keep writing!

Literary Tropes: The Love Triangle

Alright folks, it’s time for some real talk about a literary (and tv/movie) trope that seems to get people hyped up, which often results in some not-so-nice comments toward the creators of said works.

Now, I’m the last one to say that your comments are unfounded because you are definitely 100% entitled to your opinion – ’tis the way of the free world and all. BUT I don’t think it’s fair to be quite so mean in the delivery of said opinion – I’m just sayin’.

Granted this post is more rant than anything, but hopefully it provides a little more insight into why writers use this trope and why it’s useful.

WHY LOVE TRIANGLE’S ARE USED:

1. To show character development.

I think Alec Baldwin’s character Jack Donaghy on 30 Rock explained it best in episode 4.20 “The Moms” when he said, “They both give me different things. One connects me to the man I was. The other inspires…”

For those of you who don’t watch 30 Rock, in the later part of season 4, Jack is confronted with two love interests: his high school sweetheart, Nancy, and a younger, spitfire reporter, Avery. This love triangle comes at a point in Jack’s career where he can either sit back and lazily fall in line with his new parent company or he can continue to fight for innovation. I [speculate] the 30 Rock writers included this love triangle to draw parallels between Jack’s professional and personal decisions. When Jack does end up challenging Kabletown (the new parent company) to innovate and expand, he also ends up making the decision to choose Avery over Nancy.

2. It can provide plot depth & potential twists.

Okay, so this is where we start jumping into opinions. Personally, I have no real issues with a love triangle, provided it’s done well. I have a small obsession with Tamora Pierce’s Song of the Lioness series, so I’m surprised this is my first reference to these books . . .

In this series, the protagonist Alanna trades places with her twin brother, so she can become a knight. Throughout her adventures, Alanna combats a plethora of issues and evils, but one of her personal hurdles is choosing between three [I guess that makes it a love quadrangle?] handsome and noble[ish] men. As the plot thickens and stakes are raised, we readers get to watch characters overcome personal opinions and frustrations to achieve larger goals. Each love interest provides a greater understanding of Alanna’s world but also challenges Alanna’s perceptions (and the perceptions of her other suitors).

WHY THEY GO HORRIBLY WRONG:

So I have my own list of love triangles that I really just didn’t enjoy reading/watching, but instead of going down that road, here’s WHY I find myself getting annoyed with this trope. Hint: It has nothing to do with the trope itself.

1. Characters aren’t fully developed.

If you’re going to write a love triangle, there NEEDS to be a reason for these characters to throw themselves into it. No sane person would put his or herself in the ridiculous position of falling in love with two different people, so why should your characters? You need to provide a reason why your MC would gravitate toward his/her separate love interests.

2. The love triangle is the main plot.

I have a hard time accepting this specific trope as an actual plot. It’s just very shallow and doesn’t really speak to real character growth. My recommendation: use it as a subplot to help move the main plot along, but please don’t make your story all about “oh deary me, which handsome prince will I choose?”. Just don’t. Please.

3. Your female character has no agency.

Quite a few blogs have been touching on the subject of female characters and their ability to affect plot, and there’s a reason for this: IT’S IMPORTANT! Seriously, if your female protagonist has no say in her story, there’s really no point in her even being there. If you have a female protagonist as the center of a love triangle, the subplot of her decision needs to be based on her decision, not how macho her suitors are.

Well that’s my rant on love triangles.

Happy writing & reading, everybody!