Why You Need To Write For You

Well I have hit that point in the revision process where my MS and I are at a standstill, just staring at each other, waiting on the other to make a move.

Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE my characters and their stories, but making sure the writing is doing them all justice is – in one word – REALLYEFFINGDIFFICULT.

As a reader, the writing can either make or break a story for me, depending on the issue. Unimaginative writing can turn a brilliant character into a flat one or a character’s emotional climax into a plot point, neither creates a story that will stick around with you years after you’ve read it. I know the stories that I’ve hung onto over the years and if one of my stories can do that for someone else, I will feel like I’ve succeeded.

But here’s the reality of it all, even if I am never published, if I never receive representation, I don’t think I’ll ever stop writing. Sure, it would be fantastic if all this hard work and dedication paid off, but at the end of the day, I’m writing for me. I have done enough research on the industry to know that the odds of getting a 5-book deal (because that’s the length of the series I’m working on is – sorry possible future agent [if I’m lucky]) is EXTREMELY unlikely.

Does that mean I’m going to give up? NOOOOOOPE!

Writing fiction makes me happy. Getting to tell the stories of the 6 heroines in my series make me happy. Getting to play with all my favorite elements of the shows/books/movies I grew up on and love makes me happy.

Sure, the process is daunting and frustrating and sometimes disheartening. But I love what I do and if you love the story you’re writing, so should you!

Happy Writing, Everybody!

*On a separate note, me being a realist hardly means that I am not going to query. Once this new version of the MS is done, you better believe I’m going to start querying and submitting. ha ha. I’m just super aware of the challenges ahead. Here’s to hoping the characters/plots/world speak for themselves! 

5 Steps to Becoming More Productive

We’ve all had those moments where we shout at our deadlines, “if only I had more time!” Lord knows I’ve prayed for 28-hour days more than once. Unfortunately we mere mortals only get a measly 24 hours to accomplish everything on our [if you’re like me, then an extremely long] to-do list.

IMPORTANT NOTE: After my eighth formal submission for the 4-hour daily extension, I got an email reply from the universe saying that due to the rotation of the earth and the delicate cosmic balance that makes our planet inhabitable, my request was indefinitely denied. Sorry, folks.

So how do we juggle all our responsibilities and still find time for our creative endeavors?

1. Get a planner.

Seriously, whether it’s on your phone, tablet, computer or you wanna rock a tradition print copy, a planner is an invaluable resource to keeping your responsibilities and projects organized.

If you’re in the market for a great print planner, take a look at “Passion Planner.” Along with monthly calendars and weekly breakdowns, Passion Planner was designed to keep you motivated [and organized], so you can achieve your goals. You can find more information about Passion Planner at www.passionplanner.com.

2. Make a list of what’s important.

I know this seems ridiculous, but sometimes it helps to see what’s important to you in an itemized list. When you’re allocating time for everything in your week, it’s a lot easier to look at that list and start carving out appropriate time for each item. For me personally, my dog and my writing come before social engagements. It’s not the most popular choice I make, but if I haven’t met a writing deadline, I’m not getting to drink that brewsky on Saturday night. Thems be the rules.

3. Make REALISTIC goals for yourself.

Here’s where it starts to get tricky. All of us want to complete that novel in 30 days, but let’s face it, if you work 40 hours a week, have kids [including the furry kind], and have [some other required miscellaneous engagement], odds are you’re not going to have the hours to punch out 80k+ words.

So set little goals. Instead of having the mantra “I’m going to finish this month,” change it to “I’m going to write 1000 words a day.” Believe me, simply changing the verbiage in your goals can turn something overwhelmingly dreadful into continuously motivating.

4. Cut out what doesn’t need to be there.

Trust me, I’m just as addicted to TV as the next person, BUT finding out who GoT killed off can wait until after the current chapter is written.

5. Remember that LIFE HAPPENS!

Though deadlines are important, please remember that life happens. There are going to be days where your 9-5 demands some overtime or your friends need a favor. Your goals are important, but so is your sanity. So strive for success, but don’t stress if it takes a little longer to get there.

Happy writing, everybody!